I'm an Indian, too 

What’s so funny about the 1491s?

Page 6 of 7

If you ask the members of the 1491s if they ever felt a video went too far, all of them will say no. But because of the reaction it elicited from viewers, they will all also mention “Halloween PSA.” The video opens with Matt Kull, an occasional group collaborator, looking sincerely into the camera and saying, “Hello, white folks…It’s almost that time of year when you are going to make some important decisions … That’s right, it’s almost Halloween and you’re going to need a costume.”

The video continues with Kull discussing the inclination of “hipsters, college professors [and] those of you who are fans of teams with Indian mascots” to dress up as American Indians for Halloween. “That costume is bullshit,” he says.

click to enlarge Missoula Independent news
  • Wilson, a spoken word artist from Minnesota, left, and Harjo, a filmmaker from Oklahoma.

The video continues with Kull offering a detailed explanation of why it’s bullshit, until it cuts to a scene where Kull’s face is painted black and he wears a giant Afro wig. He holds a watermelon and swigs from a brown-bagged bottle of booze. He concludes, “So stop and think for a minute about what it is that you’re doing [when wearing an Indian costume]. Not only are you making yourself look extremely ignorant, but you are making white folks as a whole group look ignorant as well,” he says. “And everyone knows white folks rarely if ever make racially charged fashion statements for the sake of entertainment.” The words “Think Before you Indian” appear on the screen before the closing credits.

According to Pensoneau, the video provoked a furor of vitriol on online message boards and blogs. “People who identify as oppressed said we can’t do that ever,” he says, referring to the scene where a white Kull wears blackface. “They said you can’t use one person’s oppression to make that statement … But that’s not the conversation we were trying to have.”

After the video was posted, the members of the 1491s discussed how best to deal with the backlash. For a while, they took the time to respond on message boards, and further explain the point they were making. But it quickly became clear that was only adding fuel to a flame that just wanted to blaze.

Instead, three days after the original, they posted a second video. It features a black screen with the 1491s’ logo and the voice of Pensoneau reading from a prepared statement. At one point during the statement, Pensoneau distills their message: “It’s a horrible truth in today’s society that you can go to a Halloween party dressed as Tonto and nobody will give two shits. But if you go dressed as Sambo you get all the shit in the world,” he says. “We’re just looking for an equal amount of shit-giving.”

The response video concludes with Pensoneau interviewing a woman he met at a University of Utah Utes football tailgate. The woman says she identifies as both Navajo and African-American. She is standing next to a table where a white girl wearing a headdress is throwing ping-pong balls into plastic cups of beer.

“Would you put on black face if it were part of the team tradition?” Pensoneau asks the girl, who is also dressed like an “Ute.”

“No,” she says.

Pensoneau then gestures to the girl playing beer-pong. “So why would this be okay and that not?”

The girl pauses and stares away from the camera. “I have absolutely no idea,” she says.

Tags: ,

  • Email
  • Print

Readers also liked…

  • Oiled, soiled and spoiled

    What happened when Montana’s Yellowstone River turned black–and how that environmental disaster is influencing pipelines nationwide
    • Feb 7, 2013
  • Glaze of glory

    As a new doughnut shop opens in Missoula, we savor the history and culture of America's favorite treat
    • Apr 4, 2013

More by Jamie Rogers

  • Noah thanks

    Hollywood panders to hardcore Christians and neuters a filmmaker in the process
    • Apr 24, 2014
  • A history of violence

    Can Missoula public schools truly be prepared for a school shooting?
    • Apr 10, 2014
  • Home for the holidays

    An occasionally heroic tale of surviving Christmas with the family
    • Dec 19, 2013
  • More »

Comments (6)

Showing 1-6 of 6

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-6 of 6

Add a comment

© 2014 Missoula News/Independent Publishing | Powered by Foundation