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Comment Archives: stories: News: Opinion: Last 30 Days

Re: “Break with convention

xenophobic grief.....what's wrong with those people?

Posted by Jim Smith on 07/21/2016 at 2:19 PM

Re: “Break with convention

His devotion to the other 98% of the GOP platform is what drives me to do everything in my power to send Denise to DC to replace him. I'm sure he's a nice guy and I'm glad to see so many of my fellow veterans continuing to serve their country even after discharge but his Party has lost it's bearings and is foundering on Fascist shores. Voting for anything other than the GOP candidates is simply a matter of self defense-we cannot allow the Greedy Oligarch Party to continue their destruction of our government, the tool We The People use to protect ourselves from aristocratic rule.

4 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by bob petersen on 07/21/2016 at 12:44 PM

Re: “Smells like town spirit

Deja vu all over again....sort of....

The East Asians who migrated to the Americas from what is believed to have been Southwest Siberia can be said to have had a similar experience in all that they have lost and was taken from them by migrating colonialists in just a few generations. But the crimes committed on the First peoples of the Americas can not be compared to the migrations of today and deserve far more than just one line and I can not and will not try to serve that properly here.

Human migrations can be interesting:
From Africa to the world as a whole.
There was the First Peoples to the Americas from East Asia.
The Europeans to the Americas for colonialism.

To more modern times:
The dust bowl era mostly to California.
The rust belt to the southeastern part of the states for jobs and a better quality of life for their kids.

But the migrations are different now, seems to be more about whatever is trendy at the time:
Everybody in New England knows what a “Masshole” is.
Upstate New York disowns the city.
“Damn Yankees ruined The South”.
Wisconsin complains about Illinois.
Everybody from the Rocky Mountain states west complain about Californians.
Anybody remember Southern Utah or Colorado thirty years ago? Really some cool places before they were put on a map....

The new migrations seem to be focused on the rocky mountain states now, and specifically on Montana; but nobody comes to Montana for money unless you're a miner, real estate speculator, or a developer. So what is creating such a large draw? Why are so many migrating to a place that is expensive to live in and becoming more so as it grows and becomes more crowded and has few good paying jobs? Was it all those trendy magazine articles rating Missoula as the top ten of this, that, and the other thing?

Most Californians learned to be quiet about where they came from and why they were migrating here. Washingtonians were the opposite. They loudly and enthusiastically declared Montana to be “god's country” and therefor the trendiest place to be, and “Washington to be a hellhole” back in the late 90s, and by 2006, it seemed Washington state had annexed Western Montana. --why are local real estate prices nearly three times what local income can afford?

It is a bit too late, the horse has been let out of the barn, but we are experiencing some serious growing pains around here and we need to learn to step much more lightly and think about what we are doing to a place we all want to love before it is loved and capitalized on to death. I'm tell you that this cancerous growth this place is inflicted with is not sustainable and will kill this place! It has been seen many times before!

The “Last Best Place” is well on its' way to being just like everywhere else....but too expensive for locals to afford!

Posted by Joe Nomad on 07/17/2016 at 7:12 PM

Re: “The long view

Yes it's true old ladies at school athletic events have been known to use the boy's bathroom. It's a common scene. A big crowd -- women and girls lined up at the girl's bathroom. Boy's room has emptied out.

Grandma forgot to put on her Depends and there's no denying -- it's an emergency. The only sane course of action is to post a guard at the boy's bathroom and follow nature's call. The alternative would be a puddle in the hall.

4 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Carole Mackin on 07/15/2016 at 8:55 AM

Re: “The long view

Dan Brooks is a friggin Idiot. I thank I'll go wipe my a-- with his bull shit article.

4 likes, 5 dislikes
Posted by jr2jr2000 on 07/14/2016 at 4:06 PM

Re: “The long view

I've said several times before in my comments on articles in the Indy that Montana seems, unfortunately, to be getting more and more like Idaho. And this is another example.

2 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by alf on 07/14/2016 at 1:56 PM

Re: “The long view

Thanks for brightening up my day. Attorney General Fox certainly marches to the beat of his own drummer, however off the beat it is.

5 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by capbob on 07/14/2016 at 11:27 AM

Re: “The long view

I really don't know how I lived my life up to mid-2016 while this monumental problem was simmering under the surface. Just think, all through the 90s and 2000s we had this bathroom problem and we didn't even know. How did we manage? Thank God we're talking about it now. I can feel the world getting better already.

7 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by Greg Strandberg on 07/14/2016 at 9:53 AM

Re: “Smells like town spirit

We Indians laugh at 'native' and 'longtime' Missoulians and their lily-white statements like:

"You have to try to see it from the eyes of those who knew this place before you came to know it. Because what you came to know, or think you know, is much different from what we knew and loved."

"the best of Missoula was gone before you got here"

"I guard my secrets very carefully anymore and will not participate in things like the "Best of Missoula", or share my favorite places to recreate, what little is left of them"

Posted by Shane on 07/13/2016 at 10:57 AM

Re: “Smells like town spirit

When considering whether Montana is full or not one needs to consider what our quality of life and affordability of life was when Montana had a population of less than 900,000 people, and how we knew and how we were connected to this place. You can't compare this place to any other place, most certainly not New York City.

Now that our population is officially over one million, it takes basically three local incomes to buy local real estate. It is not marketed for or to the locals.
And most all of my favorite places to recreate are now not worth going back to anymore. Traffic? We didn't use to have traffic, just a short time ago.

When considering whether Montana is full or not one needs to also consider tourist visitation: around 4 million for Yellowstone NP and 2.36 million for Glacier NP in 2015.

And we should not forget the constant flow of part-time and transient residents who are not counted in census counts, as well as the constant flow of visitors from Washington state, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, and Colorado -- year round. And then there is this crazy amount of year round travelers from everywhere else as well. We use to have a winter that prohibited this kind of travel insulating us from the crazy growth we are now experiencing.

For some who can look back more than thirty years, and for others who can look back for generations who can see the rapid change this place is now inflicted with, the kind of change that excludes us, is Montana full yet?

You have to try to see it from the eyes of those who knew this place before you came to know it. Because what you came to know, or think you know, is much different from what we knew and loved.

And then there is the issue of seven billion people on this planet and growing....anybody else remember when the milestone of six billion people was going to be an environmental disaster?

Posted by Joe Bear on 07/12/2016 at 2:23 PM

Re: “Smells like town spirit

Oh, and falafel....it would be nice to have a falafel cart downtown, but then I would have to stand in line behind a bunch of loud people I have never seen before and most likely will never see again -- the reason I guard my secrets very carefully anymore and will not participate in things like the "Best of Missoula", or share my favorite places to recreate, what little is left of them.

For that reason and a the fact that Mayor McGentrification expects us to pay for the increased costs of his growth and development of this town, I find it better to do my own cooking, I do like my cooking. I had a Jordanian housemate for a time thirty something years ago, he taught me a thing or two about falafel. I tweaked it a bit and made it my own over the years.

Find a good falafel mix you like, add some curry powder, garlic, sesame seeds, extra virgin olive oil. I like to make them into patties, baste in olive oil and broil them on each side until golden, rather than deep fry them. Add fresh leafy veggies, parsley, tomatoes, olives, feta, hummus w/cayenne....have fun!

....Hopefully, the next time I need a falafel fix, there will be some left for me to buy....

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Joe Bear on 07/11/2016 at 2:26 PM

Re: “Smells like town spirit

Sorry, but I stopped paying any attention to the "Best of Missoula" thingy back when a bunch of clueless newbies voted the new Albertsons (1998/2000ish) down on south Higgins as "Best of Missoula". Clueless, because isn't it suppose to be about uniquely Missoulian and not chain stores?

Sorry you never got a chance to get Missoula, the best of Missoula was gone before you got here.

If you were old enough, and been around here long enough, you'd know and understand what we are mourning about.


The growth, change, and gentrification is accelerating now, if you hang around long enough, in this transient community, you'll have chance to feel your own sense of loss.

Dan, many Missoulains are very well traveled. I do have an intimate knowledge of this continent, even been to the Island a few times. I have seen many cool little places be consumed by trendy growth and development, but none in the way that Missoula has; and none as unique and special as Missoula. It is a loss.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Joe Bear on 07/11/2016 at 1:31 PM

Re: “Success story

The subtitle to this article should be, "I'm Gonna Pi** on Your Back and Try To Convince You It's Raining." What a bunch of b.s. Even if we use the inflated numbers of the USFWS, there is only one grizzly per every 45.83 square miles in the Yellowstone Ecosystem. Overpopulation? Hardly. This is just an excuse for blood-thirsty individual to kill for the simple reason that they like killing.

We have been coming to Yellowstone from the Midwest twice a year for the last twenty-five years. Our average stay is ten to fourteen days. Our primary reason for visiting is to see grizzlies up close. If delisting leads to the situation where seeing grizzlies in and around Yellowstone reverts to like it was in the early 1990's, your economy will lose our business and that of a whole lot other folks. If we're not going to see grizzlies, there's no need to come to Montana and Wyoming, get up at 4:30 a.m. to find bears that are no longer there. Instead, our vacation dollars will go to the community of San Diego where we can sleep until 9:00, hit the beaches by noon and still find a place to park.

Think long and hard before you declare open season on the grizzly. You may not enjoy "tourist season" but, your economies absolutely depend on it.

4 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Jeff N Sam on 07/08/2016 at 12:00 PM

Re: “Success story

I find the facts misleading, comparing Alaska's grizzly bears with the lower 48 cannot be done without all the facts The lower 48 is spreading out due to climate change not because of capacity. They are searching for different food sources. Comparing these two areas without including this information is completely and totally misleading the public. The reduction of Miller Moths, cutthroat trout white pine bark are definitely affecting grizzly bears. If you are going to write an article and informed the public all the facts should be confronted not just picking and choosing what you want to write about

5 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Carol Deech on 07/08/2016 at 9:17 AM

Re: “Success story

I am glad to see the author recommends several means of reducing conflict between livestock/humans and grizzlies. These are valuable ideas that everyone living in grizzly country should be implementing.

That, though, is where the value in this article ends. Objections to grizzly delisting are about hunting, yes, but they are also about much more. First, the author is correct that the population has remained stable. That's right. It is stable but not growing. In fact, the GYE grizzly population has not grown since the early 2000s, while mortality is increasing. True again that grizzlies are re-inhabiting territories. This is not due to population expansion but to elimination of key food supplies, forcing grizzlies to range farther in search of food. Other significant non-hunting related objections include that fact that the population is genetically isolated from other grizzly populations, grizzlies have one of the slowest reproduction rates in North America, and that it is so difficult for hunters to tell the difference between a male and female grizzly that the Montana regulation states: "Season will close within 24 hours of reaching either the female quota or the male quota because sex identification of individual bears is nearly impossible in the field."

So yeah, the furor about grizzly delisting is a lot more than just an emotional reaction to hunting.

6 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Ida Michelle Bean on 07/07/2016 at 10:57 PM

Re: “Success story

Couldn't have said it better myself, Laura!

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Debby Nelson on 07/07/2016 at 2:22 PM

Re: “Success story

Delisting the Yellowstone-area grizzlies is premature...and trophy hunting them is out of the question. Bears face an uncertain future with critical changes in their traditional food supply--due in part to climate change; with obstacles to habitat expansion and connectivity to other bear populations; with the possibility of immediate trophy hunting when too many conflict-related mortalities already occur; and grizzly bears have one of the slowest rates of reproduction among terrestrial mammals due to the late age of first motherhood (4-9 yrs.), small average litter size, and the long interval between litters (3 or more years). If humans want to be proud of something, they should show some restraint and humility, learn to co-exist with bears, and refrain from "managing" grizzlies for trophy mounts and bearskin rugs.

8 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Other Nations on 07/07/2016 at 1:17 PM

Re: “Success story

We've seen only too often what happens when Agency workers, who seem to view trophy hunters as their most highly valued constituents, push "pride" in the "success" of an Endangered Species "recovery." Immediately, the states fast-track hunting legislation, envisioning the millions of dollars rolling in; hikers are prosecuted for freeing eagles from traps; eagles are poisoned by farmers, and habitat protections are lost as public lands are sold off to developers.

"Recovery" isn't just a numbers criteria, and this is wisely spelled out in the ESA: the conditions which caused extirpation in the first place must be redressed. Not mitigated, not compromised - redressed.

We have shown that it takes much longer than two or three generations for humans to change their attitudes about predators. Wolves continue to be reviled wherever they have met population criteria only for "recovery;" mountain lions and bears "managed" as "game," foxes and coyotes persecuted relentlessly, year round, with poisons (Wildlife Services), traps and hounds (Wisconsin). These policies do nothing to mitigate, let alone redress, our short-sighted attitudes toward apex predators and the intrinsic value they hold in healthy and resilient ecosystems.

If numbers were the sole criteria for "revovery," then we could discuss removal of Federal protections. But it isn't, and the framers of the ESA, our nation's most popular, and successful environmental legislation, wisely addressed that. If money is your argument, wolves ALIVE have brought in more money - $35 Million annually, and climbing - to the GYA than ALL WOLF HUNTING IN ALL STATES, COMBINED since protections were removed. USFWS statistics continue to report MORE federal, state and local income from wildlife watchers than ALL HUNTING AND FISHING COMBINED.

However, money, numbers and habitat each represent a fragment of the definition for recovery, and until perhaps the most important fragment of that definition - human attitude - changes, then there is more than enough evidence to argue for PERMANENT PROTECTIONS for any ESA listed species.

Laura Menefee
Wildlife Conservation
Sierra Club, John Muir Chapter

8 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by L Menefer on 07/07/2016 at 1:04 PM

Re: “Success story

We've seen only too often what hapoens when Agency workers, who seem to view trophy hunters as their most highly valued constituents, push "pride" in the "success" of an Endangered Species "recovery." Immediately, the states fast-track hunting legislation, envisioning the millions of dollars rolling in; hikers are prosecuted for freeing eagles from traps; eagles are poisoned by farmers, and habitat protections are lost as public lands are sold off to developers.

"Recovery" isn't just a numbers criteria, and this is wisely spelled out in the ESA: the conditions which caused extirpation in the first place must be redressed. Not mitigated, not compromised - redressed.

We have shown that it takes much longer than two or three generations for humans to change their attitudes about predators. Wolves continue to be reviled wherever they have met population criteria only for "recovery;" mountain lions and bears "managed" as "game," foxes and coyotes persecuted relentlessly, year round, with poisons (Wildlife Services), traps and hounds (Wisconsin). These policies do nothing to mitigate, let alone redress, our short-sighted attitudes toward apex predators and the intrinsic value they hold in healthy and resilient ecosystems.

If numbers were the sole criteria for "revovery," then we could discuss removal of Federal protections. But it isn't, and the framers of the ESA, our nation's most popular, and successful environmental legislation, wisely addressed that. If money is your argument, wolves ALIVE have brought in more money - $35 Million annually, and climbing - to the GYA than ALL WOLF HUNTING IN ALL STATES, COMBINED since protections were removed. USFWS statistics continue to report MORE federal, state and local income from wildlife watchers than ALL HUNTING AND FISHING COMBINED.

However, money, numbers and habitat each represent a fragment of the definition for recovery, and until perhaps the most important fragment of that definition - human attitude - changes, then there is more than enough evidence to argue for PERMANENT PROTECTIONS for any ESA listed species.

Laura Menefee
Wildlife Conservation
Sierra Club, John Muir Chapter

7 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by L Menefer on 07/07/2016 at 1:02 PM

Re: “Success story

Agreed!!

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Debby Nelson on 07/07/2016 at 12:47 PM

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