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click to enlarge IT’S WHAT’S FOR DINNER: Four heifers pose outside the Hilton Garden Inn on Reserve Street in November for the annual Montana Farm Bureau Federation meeting. The Coleman Limousine heifers from Charlo allowed local 4H and Future Farmers of America members to gain experience in judging cattle. - PHOTO BY CATHRINE L. WALTERS
  • Photo by Cathrine L. Walters
  • IT’S WHAT’S FOR DINNER: Four heifers pose outside the Hilton Garden Inn on Reserve Street in November for the annual Montana Farm Bureau Federation meeting. The Coleman Limousine heifers from Charlo allowed local 4H and Future Farmers of America members to gain experience in judging cattle.

click to enlarge UP IN SMOKE: The Montana Clean Indoor Air Act, which was drafted during the 2005 Legislature, allowed bars and casinos to gradually transition to smoke-free over the last four years. But that buffer period officially ended Oct. 1, clearing the air at traditionally smoke-filled establishments, like The Golden Rose, above. - PHOTO BY ANNE MEDLEY
  • Photo by Anne Medley
  • UP IN SMOKE: The Montana Clean Indoor Air Act, which was drafted during the 2005 Legislature, allowed bars and casinos to gradually transition to smoke-free over the last four years. But that buffer period officially ended Oct. 1, clearing the air at traditionally smoke-filled establishments, like The Golden Rose, above.

click to enlarge DEAD MAN’S PARTY: El Zombi Gato rocks out in front of a group of longstanding members of the local rock scene. The all-star collective consists of musicians who’ve long rocked in popular Missoula acts like Secret Powers, Sasshole, Cicada, Thee Hedons and others since the mid-’90s. - PHOTO BY CHAD HARDER
  • Photo by Chad Harder
  • DEAD MAN’S PARTY: El Zombi Gato rocks out in front of a group of longstanding members of the local rock scene. The all-star collective consists of musicians who’ve long rocked in popular Missoula acts like Secret Powers, Sasshole, Cicada, Thee Hedons and others since the mid-’90s.

click to enlarge HOMEGROWN: The medical marijuana movement made huge strides in 2009 as the number of registered patients jumped from 1,577 in December 2008 to 5,935 in December 2009, according to the Montana Department of Public Health & Human Services. Duke Martin, a registered caregiver in northwestern Montana, was among the first to openly speak about working within state law when the Independent interviewed him in February. By the end of the year, storefront dispensaries and clinics had opened throughout the state. - PHOTO BY CHAD HARDER
  • Photo by Chad Harder
  • HOMEGROWN: The medical marijuana movement made huge strides in 2009 as the number of registered patients jumped from 1,577 in December 2008 to 5,935 in December 2009, according to the Montana Department of Public Health & Human Services. Duke Martin, a registered caregiver in northwestern Montana, was among the first to openly speak about working within state law when the Independent interviewed him in February. By the end of the year, storefront dispensaries and clinics had opened throughout the state.

click to enlarge IN THE GROOVE: Missoula native and hip-hop statesman James Two, aka Jimi Nasset, returned home for a handful of shows this year, including a spot during the three-day local music extravaganza, Total Fest. Count former Indy calendar editor Jonas Ehudin, background, among Nasset’s local fans. - PHOTO BY CHAD HARDER
  • Photo by Chad Harder
  • IN THE GROOVE: Missoula native and hip-hop statesman James Two, aka Jimi Nasset, returned home for a handful of shows this year, including a spot during the three-day local music extravaganza, Total Fest. Count former Indy calendar editor Jonas Ehudin, background, among Nasset’s local fans.
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