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click to enlarge IN HEAVY ROTATION: Local cover band The Fidgets—from left, Tyson Roth, Travis Yost and Ricky Drake—are known for performing ridiculously fun songs with non-ironic earnestness. “We play ‘Ghostbusters’ as if this song kicks so much ass,” explains Yost. “Like, ‘The first time I listened to that song I cried, I got my period, we have to play that song now!’” - PHOTO BY CHAD HARDER
  • Photo by Chad Harder
  • IN HEAVY ROTATION: Local cover band The Fidgets—from left, Tyson Roth, Travis Yost and Ricky Drake—are known for performing ridiculously fun songs with non-ironic earnestness. “We play ‘Ghostbusters’ as if this song kicks so much ass,” explains Yost. “Like, ‘The first time I listened to that song I cried, I got my period, we have to play that song now!’”

click to enlarge A STONE’S THROW: Kerri Rosenstein’s homage to her father consisted of 23,024 stones colored with biodegradable red milk paint—one for each day of her father’s life. Rosenstein designed the installation, which was on display at the Missoula Art Museum in June, July and August, in hopes that people would remove a stone and return it to nature. The Missoula artist continues to track where the stones have ended up (see rosestones.blogspot.com), and the exhibit—or what remains of it—is currently on display in Miami, Fla. - PHOTO BY CHAD HARDER
  • Photo by Chad Harder
  • A STONE’S THROW: Kerri Rosenstein’s homage to her father consisted of 23,024 stones colored with biodegradable red milk paint—one for each day of her father’s life. Rosenstein designed the installation, which was on display at the Missoula Art Museum in June, July and August, in hopes that people would remove a stone and return it to nature. The Missoula artist continues to track where the stones have ended up (see rosestones.blogspot.com), and the exhibit—or what remains of it—is currently on display in Miami, Fla.

click to enlarge SUMMER SWIM: A mature billy with a broken horn splashes through the soggy bottoms beneath Bearhat Mountain in Glacier National Park. Technically not a true goat, mountain goats are more closely related to cattle and antelope. They live in rugged alpine areas in an effort to avoid predators. - PHOTO BY CHAD HARDER
  • Photo by Chad Harder
  • SUMMER SWIM: A mature billy with a broken horn splashes through the soggy bottoms beneath Bearhat Mountain in Glacier National Park. Technically not a true goat, mountain goats are more closely related to cattle and antelope. They live in rugged alpine areas in an effort to avoid predators.

click to enlarge CUT OFF AT THE PASS: Two ambitious adventurers have an early-season bid to ski in Glacier National Park thwarted by a swollen, impassable McDonald Creek. - PHOTO BY CHAD HARDER
  • Photo by Chad Harder
  • CUT OFF AT THE PASS: Two ambitious adventurers have an early-season bid to ski in Glacier National Park thwarted by a swollen, impassable McDonald Creek.

click to enlarge IN THE NEWS: Bitterroot resident and pop music icon Huey Lewis earned a bad reputation among some locals for how he manages his land, particularly his unsuccessful efforts to close Mitchell Slough to the public. Lewis told his side of the story to the Independent in June. “I’m just a name on a sign,” he said, referring to the infamous warning that marks his private property. “I represent the rich, out-of-state landowners, and I’m not even out-of-state.” - PHOTO BY CHAD HARDER
  • Photo by Chad Harder
  • IN THE NEWS: Bitterroot resident and pop music icon Huey Lewis earned a bad reputation among some locals for how he manages his land, particularly his unsuccessful efforts to close Mitchell Slough to the public. Lewis told his side of the story to the Independent in June. “I’m just a name on a sign,” he said, referring to the infamous warning that marks his private property. “I represent the rich, out-of-state landowners, and I’m not even out-of-state.”
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