Friday, March 3, 2017

Vintage bikes to be exhibited as First Friday art show

Posted By on Fri, Mar 3, 2017 at 12:03 PM

I’m pretty sure it’s a rule of the universe that cycling nerds can’t talk about old bikes without telling you about our own. I’ll be quick. Mine’s a 1973 Raleigh International that I rebuilt (rather amateurishly) from the frame up. The lugs are gorgeous. I had it painted gold, then asked a shop to cut the frame in half so my bike and I could travel the world together. That never happened, and now this vintage Frankenstein’s Monster sits in my basement.

Anyway, the bikes to be showcased on First Friday have had a lot more TLC than my Raleigh. In fact, the word on the street as that these wheels are road ready. “They’re not just bikes that he has sitting on a rack and polishes and keeps in this pristine condition,” says Missoula Bicycle Works owner Alex Gallego. “They are in pretty pristine condition, but he rides these bikes.”
Larry Lockwood will display his collection of restored vintage road bikes at Missoula Bicycle Works tonight as part of a First Friday show. - PHOTO BY DEREK BROUWER
  • Photo by Derek Brouwer
  • Larry Lockwood will display his collection of restored vintage road bikes at Missoula Bicycle Works tonight as part of a First Friday show.

That rider is Larry Lockwood, who after retiring has made a hobby of finding and restoring (and riding again) the kinds of bikes he rode in the 70s. "Missoula in the early 70s was pretty much a cycling hotbed," he says, before pulling out old photos of group rides. One of the bikes on display tonight is the same machine he's riding in the photos.

"I consider them to be works of art," he says.

Gallego decided to organize the show after realizing that Lockwood and another of his customers, Dirk Visser, had amassed impressive collections of bikes that date back to the 40s. Gallego starts reading the list to me: a couple Hetchens, a Claud Butler, a Porsche mountain bike, and a mid-80s Kestrel roadie with one of the first carbon frames around. Gallego remembers eyeing those Kestrels himself back when they were produced. “I was absolutely blown away,” he says. I imagine I will be, too.

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Thursday, March 2, 2017

Thursday's avalanche forecast: Considerable danger

Posted By on Thu, Mar 2, 2017 at 8:20 AM

From the West Central Montana Avalanche Center: The current avalanche danger is CONSIDERABLE in the west central Montana backcountry. Careful snowpack evaluation, cautious route-finding, and conservative decision-making are essential today. Human triggered avalanches are likely.
considerable-450.png

Good morning, this is Travis Craft with the West Central Montana Avalanche Center’s avalanche advisory for March 02, 2017. This danger rating does not apply to operating ski areas, expires at midnight tonight and is the sole responsibility of the U.S. Forest Service.

To see the full advisory, plus photos and video, visit the West Central Montana Avalanche Center's website.

Here's what the National Weather Service's backcountry forecast has to say heading into the weekend:

Scattered snow showers will be limited to northwest Montana Thursday and Friday as a ridge builds into the region and stabilizes the atmosphere to the south. Along with this ridge warmer temperatures back to near normal will occur. Saturday through early next week a more organized weather disturbance and cooler air will impact the region. Expect mountain snow accumulations through the middle of next week. 

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Ryan Zinke confirmed as Secretary of the Interior

Posted By on Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 11:11 AM

After weeks of anticipation, the U.S. Senate this morning finally took a vote on the confirmation of Montana’s Ryan Zinke as Secretary of the Interior. Zinke tallied up 68 yeas and 31 nays (Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Georgia, didn’t vote). A smattering of Democrats joined the bulk of Republicans in giving our now-former congressman the green light, with Sen. Jon Tester and North Dakota’s Sen. Heidi Heitkamp among them. So there you have it, folks. Zinke is officially a member of President Donald Trump’s cabinet. Now he can resign, and political parties back home can finally start scheduling the nominating conventions that will bring Montana one step closer to a new congressional delegate.
Ryan Zinke, confirmed this morning as Secretary of the Interior. - PHOTO BY ALEX SAKARIASSEN
  • photo by Alex Sakariassen
  • Ryan Zinke, confirmed this morning as Secretary of the Interior.

Obviously today’s news triggered a lot of reactions, particularly on the conservation front. Here’s a list of the statements from various politicians, parties and organizations now flooding our inboxes:

From Sen. Jon Tester, “As a Montanan, I know how important the Department of Interior is to supporting our western way of life, protecting our public lands, and living up to our trust responsibilities in Indian Country. I believe Congressman Zinke will do right by Montana and the country in this role. Montana will be watching, and I know he’ll make us proud.”

From Sen. Steve Daines, who called for the vote, “This is a historic moment for Montana as Congressman Zinke is the first Montanan to ever serve in a President’s cabinet. Ryan is a Montanan who grew up in America’s public lands. He knows that we must strike the right balance between conservation and responsible energy development, and he understands more than most that one-size fits all policies from Washington, D.C., never work for real America.”

From Gov. Steve Bullock, “I congratulate Ryan Zinke on his confirmation as Secretary of the Interior. Montanans know how important this post is to protecting our public lands, outdoor recreation, tourism, and natural resource industries—and the thousands of good-paying Montana jobs that rely on them. I will work closely with Secretary Zinke to ensure our state’s interests are reflected in Washington, DC, and I will hold him accountable to Montanans and to the values we place on our outdoor heritage.”

From Montana Republican Party Chairman Jeff Essmann, "There is no better person to stand up for Montana Values at the Department of Interior than Secretary Ryan Zinke. He knows the challenges Montana and other western states face when it comes to responsibly developing natural resources to create high-paying jobs, ensuring that our public lands can be enjoyed by all, and, where necessary, conserving our land under the big sky for this and future generations. Secretary Zinke is just one part of President Trump's bold plans to 'Make America Great Again,' and I look forward to Secretary Zinke's term at the Interior. I know I speak for all Montanan's who are glad that some Montana common sense finally has a place in Washington, D.C.—Congratulations Secretary Zinke!"

From Montana Wilderness Association Executive Director Brian Sybert, "Secretary Zinke has called himself a Roosevelt conservationist on multiple occasions. We will certainly hold him accountable if he does not live up to that definition. In Montana, living up to that definition will mean keeping public lands in public hands, protecting places as wild and culturally significant as the Badger-Two Medicine, and not attempting to gut or harm the Antiquities Act, a central pillar of Roosevelt's legacy."

From Chris Cox, executive director of the National Rifle Association’s Institute for Legislative Action, "On behalf of our 5 million members, the National Rifle Association congratulates Secretary Ryan Zinke on his confirmation as the 52nd Secretary of the Interior. The confirmation of an avid outdoorsman to lead the U.S. Department of the Interior marks the end of a hostile era towards hunters and sportsmen. The NRA looks forward to working with Secretary Zinke in the pursuit of true conservation that respects the rights of America’s outdoorsmen and women."

From Center for Western Priorities Executive Director Jennifer Rokala, “Ryan Zinke has said he wants to follow in the footsteps of Teddy Roosevelt, arguably our greatest conservation president. As Interior Secretary, he’ll have a chance to put those words to action. Starting on day one at the Interior Department we’ll see which Ryan Zinke shows up: the one who voted to grease the skids for selling our national public lands or the one with a backbone to stand up to some of Congress’ very worst instincts. Some in Congress are already asking Secretary Zinke and the Trump administration to eliminate one of our newest national monuments from the map. We’ll be watching closely to see whether Secretary Zinke lives up to the legacy of Teddy Roosevelt, or simply caters to campaign donors.”

From Business for Montana’s Outdoors Executive Director Marne Hayes, “We congratulate Ryan Zinke on this new opportunity to serve all Americans and wish him well as he takes on a critical role for our nation’s economy. Because our public lands are so critical to Montana jobs and our Montana way of life, we ask that Mr. Zinke fight tooth and nail to retain crucial public lands and water funding which are likely to be threatened by the President’s budget.”

From Whit Fosburgh, president and CEO of the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, “We encourage Secretary Zinke to simply solve problems constructively: Bring together diverse stakeholders, and find common ground for the benefit of fish, wildlife, and our sporting traditions. Sportsmen and women stand ready and willing to help shape a positive future for our public lands. We’re just asking that remaining concerns with the BLM Planning rule are addressed through a process that also keeps all of the improvements made to public lands management.”

From Trout Unlimited President and CEO Chris Wood, “For Trout Unlimited members and sportsmen and women across the country, there are few roles as important as Secretary of the Interior for ensuring responsible stewardship of these national treasures and our fishing and hunting heritage. From energy development and leasing on BLM lands, to regulation and reclamation of surface mining operations, to management and support of western water infrastructure and distribution networks, the Department of the Interior oversees lands and resources that will determine the future of our nation’s outdoor traditions. Only through careful management will we have robust populations of fish and wildlife and healthy places to hunt and fish for generations to come.”

From Jeremy Nichols, Climate and Energy Program Director for WildEarth Guardians, “Congressman Zinke is a fake and fraud. With Zinke’s nomination, President Trump made clear his goal of surrendering treasured American public lands to the oil, gas, and coal industries. The confirmation of Zinke should be a call to action for every American who values National Parks and public lands to stand up and resist this President’s agenda of putting the interests of fossil fuel companies before all of us Americans.”

From Earthjustice Vice President Drew Caputo, "Now that he has been confirmed to lead the Department of the Interior, we urge Secretary Zinke to respect the critical importance of these lands to the tribes and our country's heritage, and keep Bears Ears and other natural treasures intact for future generations. Anything short of that is an insult to tribes and shows profound disrespect for the Antiquities Act, which has protected this country's most cherished landscapes for more than 100 years. As long as he serves in this role, the people of the United States will look to Secretary Zinke to safeguard public lands, reject fossil fuel extraction that jeopardizes our climate, and protect imperiled wildlife. If he falls short of these responsibilities and puts our priceless natural heritage at risk, Earthjustice will hold him accountable."

From Matt Rosendale, Montana State Auditor, “Big congratulations to Ryan Zinke on being confirmed as our new Secretary of Interior. It’s great to have a fellow Montanan serving in the cabinet who understands the importance of improving access to our public lands.”

From State Superintendent Elsie Arntzen, “Congratulations to Ryan Zinke on becoming our nation’s next Interior Secretary. As Vice-Chair of the Montana Land Board, I look forward working with Secretary Zinke in his new capacity to put Montana students first. The Land Board is crucial to school funding and it will be very beneficial to have Montana leadership managing our public lands at the U.S. Department of the Interior.”

From Montana Senate President Scott Sales, R-Bozeman, “I congratulate Congressman Zinke and look forward to the leadership he will bring as Secretary to the Department of the Interior concerning the management of our lands here in the west. It is also good that the clock will start regarding the selection of his replacement in Congress. It is imperative that Montana's voice is heard in the U.S. House of Representatives.”

From Senate Majority Leader Fred Thomas, R-Stevensville: “This is truly one of the highlights of my political tenure. To see a Montana Congressman become the Secretary of the Interior is absolutely a tribute to Montana and its citizens!”

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Monday, February 27, 2017

Ween announced as the first act to play the new KettleHouse Amphitheater in July

Posted By on Mon, Feb 27, 2017 at 12:10 PM

Ween in the old days.
  • Ween in the old days.
In December, Missoula-based promotions company Logjam Presents announced it would partner with KettleHouse Brewing to open a 4,000-capacity amphitheater on the banks of the Blackfoot River in Bonner. Today, Logjam confirmed the first act for the music venue: experimental rock, soul, country, punk, funk and prog duo Ween will hit the stage on July 16.

Ween has been a band since 1984, and has released a slew of weird albums—Chocolate and Cheese, The Mollusk, 12 Golden Country Greats and Pure Guava being some of the most popular—each of which dabbles in a variety of genres. Ween's not everyone's cup of tea, but the duo has long been known for its diverse listenership, from hippies to punk rockers, so it was a downer for a lot of people when the band stopped playing together between 2011 and 2015. In an interview with Rolling Stone, and on their Facebook pages, Aaron Freeman and Mickey Melchiondo, aka, Gene and Dean Ween, gave a few reasons for the breakup, including a fight about some demo releases, subsequent hurt feelings and Freeman's need for sobriety. In a 2012 interview with MTV, though, Melchiondo said what a lot of fans were probably thinking at the time: "The idea of quitting is just laughable. This isn’t something you can quit. This is a life sentence."

Last year, Freeman and Melchiondo proved Ween really wasn't dead when it played a few reunion shows and several festivals and released a live 25th anniversary edition of its debut album, GodWeenSatan. This year, a newly announced tour schedule indicates the band is back for good, and Missoula is in the thick of its revival.

Tickets go on sale Friday, March 3, 2017, at 10 a.m. and will be available at The Top Hat, online or by phone at 877-987-6487.


Saturday, February 25, 2017

Saturday's avalanche advisory: Moderate danger

Posted By on Sat, Feb 25, 2017 at 9:00 AM

From the West Central Montana Avalanche Center: The current avalanche danger is MODERATE in the west central Montana backcountry above 6,000 feet. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern. Human triggered avalanches are possible. Below 6,000 feet the avalanche danger is LOW.
moderate-450.png

Good morning, this is Travis Craft with the West Central Montana Avalanche Center’s avalanche advisory for February 25, 2017. This danger rating does not apply to operating ski areas, expires at midnight tonight and is the sole responsibility of the U.S. Forest Service.

For the full advisory, including photos and video, visit the West Central Montana Avalanche Center's website.

Here's what the National Weather Service's backcountry forecast has to say for the rest of the weekend:

Expect some light mountain snow showers until the next cold front arrives Sunday. Through Monday morning expect 3 to 7 inches of new snow in the mid elevations and up to a foot at high elevations. As usual, this front will also bring some wind with it, but nothing exceptional is expected with ridge top winds 20 to 25 mph and gusts 30 to 40 mph Sunday night and Monday morning. Temperatures will remain cold enough that snow density is expected to be low to moderate. Additional snow accumulations are expected on Monday. 

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Thursday's avalanche advisory: Moderate danger

Posted By on Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 7:59 AM

From the West Central Montana Avalanche Center: The current avalanche danger is MODERATE in the west central Montana backcountry above 6000 feet. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern. Human triggered avalanches are possible. Below 6000 ft the avalanche danger is LOW.
moderate-450.png

Good morning, this is Travis Craft with the West Central Montana Avalanche Center’s avalanche advisory for February 23, 2017. This danger rating does not apply to operating ski areas, expires at midnight tonight and is the sole responsibility of the U.S. Forest Service.

For today's full advisory, including photos and video, head to the West Central Montana Avalanche Center's website.

Here's what the National Weather Service's backcountry forecast has to say heading into the weekend:

A cooler and unsettled weather pattern will persist through the end of the work week as a large scale upper level trough remains over the region. Precipitation will be showery in nature, with snow levels generally expected down into the valleys.

Two waves of energy will bring a better potential for widespread snow accumulations this weekend, one on Saturday and a second stronger system on Sunday. Snow levels will continue to bring snow down to the valley floors.

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Q&A: Director Michael Galinsky talks protest films and pain for Big Sky Documentary Film Fest

Posted By on Sat, Feb 18, 2017 at 11:55 AM

Filmmaker Michael Galinsky
  • Filmmaker Michael Galinsky


I wrote about Michael Galinsky last February when his photography exhibit, The Meadow, went up at Missoula's now-defunct Brink Gallery. The Chapel Hill, N.C.-based filmmaker was in the middle of making a film called All the Rage with co-directors Suki Hawley (his wife) and David Beilinson. The Meadow exhibit was mostly a street photography-style take on nature—full of gritty black-and-white shots of bees and flowers—but it was also a window into the story behind All the Rage. All the Rage is about Dr. Sarno, a professor of rehabilitation medicine at the New York University School of Medicine who believes that chronic pain is the result of stress and unattended emotional strain that manifests as muscle pain. Galinsky became one of his patients, and the meadow where he took The Meadow's pictures was a place he frequented while trying to heal his back pain.

All the Rage took 10 years to make, and the odd and compelling film gets its Northwest premiere at this week's Big Sky Documentary Film Festival. With notable appearances from Larry David and Howard Stern, it goes far beyond a basic medical story, employing personal anecdotes from Galinsky's own struggles and upbringing and weaving in a larger story about the societal costs—both emotional and financial—of a public in pain.
Galinsky and his partners, who run a film studio called Rumur, are also working on a new documentary about protests, which uses footage they've shot over the years of the Black Panthers, the Occupy movement and Trump. I spoke with Galinsky about protest documentaries and chronic pain in advance of his Big Sky screening.


How did
All The Rage come about?
Michael Galinsky: We started All the Rage in 2004. At that point, we saw it as a follow-up to our film Horns and Halos, which played at—and won—the first Big Sky Doc Fest. We imagined a film in which we followed our character, Dr. Sarno, as he fought to get his message out. However, he didn't really fight in a way that we could film, and his message was so thoroughly rejected by most people that it was incredibly hard to figure out how to fund it, or shoot it. It kind of slipped into a hiatus as we worked on other films, like Battle for Brooklyn. When we tried to put out Battle for Brooklyn, I got so stressed out that my back pain came roaring back and I found myself stuck on the floor in debilitating pain. That's when I called up Dr. Sarno and said, "We have to restart this film."
He agreed, and when we got back to work we found that the [national] problem of chronic pain was wildly worse than even a few years prior. We [also] found that people were increasingly open to and aware of the idea that the pain was connected to stress.

The film focuses on Dr. Sarno but it hints at larger ideas about society's ills. Did you know those pieces would be in there, or were there some surprises?
MG: Early on in our process of re-starting we came across an article by Jonah Lehrer called "Why Science is Failing Us." In it, he articulated many things we had been thinking but hadn't been able to explain—about how the medical system was willfully ignoring what Dr. Sarno had to say. Essentially, Dr. Sarno has been saying for over 40 years that the structural explanations for back pain—herniated disc and spinal stenosis—don't make sense, and that the treatment methods he had been taught, that are still in use, don't work. For the past 15 years, study after study has bolstered his argument, and every time they come out they are ignored, and practice doesn't really change. Even as we made the film about Dr. Sarno, we knew that these larger cultural issues that related to both systems and individuals would have to be a big part of the story.

How did you end up talking with Larry David and Howard Stern?
MG: It took many, many years to get to Howard Stern. It was kind of essential that he be in the film because the vast majority of people know about Dr. Sarno because of Howard Stern. His agent, Don Buchwald, told us he wouldn't do it, but agreed to talk with us himself because, like Howard, he owes a lot to Dr. Sarno. Suki and David did that shoot, and after it was over they were talking about what we needed to do to make the film work. Don was like, "All right, I'll ask him." The next day we got a call saying we'd get five minutes the following week. He gave us 12 and it was all great.
Larry David hadn't talked about his experience with Dr. Sarno before, and we didn't know he was a patient until we were working on a job with a 21-year-old guy who had back pain. We told him about [Sarno's] book and he said, "Larry David called that guy for me last week when we were shooting with him..." I guess [Larry David] thought that Dr. Sarno had sent us his way because he quickly agreed to let us come by.

What kind of reactions has All the Rage gotten from viewers ?
MG: We did about 50 small group screenings as we worked to shape the film. We had all kinds of people there, and we found that we had to do some surprising things to make it work. People think they want information. They want to know everything that Dr. Sarno thinks, and how he came to think it. However, when you put that info in a film it leads to more questions and more skepticism. We learned the hard way because we kept putting in more info but that only made people more skeptical, and it wasn't interesting. We started over and we found ways of weaving in ideas over time.
While we have a lot of studies that basically "prove" Dr. Sarno is on the right path, people who are resistant to those ideas aren't going to buy it anyway ... On the flip side, people who are open to the ideas, even a little bit, have been very passionate in their support.

How does it work to have all three directors from RUMUR working on projects like this?
MG: Film is the most collaborative art form. Suki, David and I all bring different sets of skills and ideas to our practice. David often has a vision for the animations and production elements that totally elevate the film. I tend to come at things with more passion than focus, and Suki is able to make sense of the energy and channel it into a film.

When did you start making the protest shorts?

MG: I never set out with the intent of documenting protests. It just kind of happened. The first shoot I ever did was the day after I graduated from high school. The Klan marched in Chapel Hill and there were about 50 protesters to every Klan member. I took my camera up there and shot a couple rolls of film. Almost 30 years later I moved from Brooklyn back into the house I grew up in and I found those negatives. I scanned a few with my iPhone and put them online and a friend from high school pointed me in the direction of sound that had been recorded that day by some guys at the college radio station. Suki married the sound with the images and it really made them come alive.

You take an observational approach to these films. Why is that important to you?
MG: Observational work can seem a bit boring in the present, but later it just has so much more power because it makes the viewer feel like they are in the situation rather than being told about it.
A couple of years after that Klan shoot I started my first real photo project, documenting malls all across America. It started out as a class project for a color photo class in college. My teacher really loved it and encouraged me to continue. I was taking pretty mundane pictures of people hanging out in malls. At the time when I showed them to people they were like, "Um, yeah that's people in a mall." Twenty five years later, when I found the slides and scanned them they exploded on the internet ... The reason I even mention that project is that these images were taking off on the internet right around the time that Occupy was happening. That's when I really started to document more protests, and from my experience with the mall images I had really come to see how powerful simple observation can be years after the fact.

Between the Occupy movement and the Trump election, how has your idea for this feature developed?
MG: I got to Seattle the day after [the Occupy protests] started there. I had gone out to show Battle for Brooklyn—our 2011 feature doc—so I went out and shot for a few hours and cut something that I projected before I showed my feature that night. There was something very powerful about presenting the work to that community while it was still unfolding.
A couple of years after Occupy, Suki and I moved to North Carolina, where the Moral Monday movement was in full swing. I think the second week we were there, we went out and made a short about that. When the election came around, we started to document some of the candidate events. Bernie's message was so connected to Occupy that we made a short about that which connected directly to our previous Occupy shorts. When Trump came to Greensboro, we made an homage to Jeff Krulik's Heavy Metal Parking Lot that we called Trump Parking Lot.
After the election, the North Carolina General Assembly started to pull some crazy shenanigans. They called themselves into session in the last few weeks before the newly elected governor was sworn in in order to pass laws limiting the power of the incoming governor. I was kind of still in shock from the election, but Suki made me come out that first day. Not a lot happened, but it was clear something was up, so the next day Suki stayed home to edit and I went to shoot. There were four days of intense protest around that and we shot a great deal. We also shot at the DNC in August, and then the inauguration, just trying to capture what both sides had to say. We thought we were done, but the Black Panthers marched the next week. Now I think we are done. Suki is doing a lot of editing of the various shorts in order to have it all make sense.

What is film's role in politics and what ideas have you come up with since the election?
MG: Well, I think there are different things that film can do. We were inspired to go down to Occupy after seeing the short films that gave a sense of what was going on. However, those films were very much aligned with the movement. While we appreciated those films and the idea of making activist work, we also thought it was important to document the situation with a kind of longer-term, historical perspective. We believe that this kind of work has much more value later.

All the Rage screens at the Hell Gate Elks Lodge Sat., Feb. 18, at 8:15 PM.

Occupy Seattle from rumur on Vimeo.

Trump Parking Lot from rumur on Vimeo.






Saturday's avalanche advisory: Moderate danger

Posted By on Sat, Feb 18, 2017 at 7:50 AM

From the West Central Montana Avalanche Center: The current avalanche danger for the West Central Montana backcountry is MODERATE above 7,000ft. Avalanches are possible in specific terrain at upper elevations. Below 7,000ft the avalanche danger is LOW and human triggered avalanches will be isolated.
moderate-450.png

Good morning, this is Logan King with the West Central Montana Avalanche Center’s avalanche advisory for Saturday, February 18, 2017. This danger rating does not apply to operating ski areas, expires at midnight tonight and is the sole responsibility of the U.S. Forest Service.

For the full advisory, along with photos and video, visit the West Central Montana Avalanche Center's website.

Here's what the National Weather Service's backcountry forecast has to say about the rest of the weekend here in west central Montana:

Southwest flow continues over the Northern Rockies and is anticipated to remain through at least Tuesday. Several weak disturbances transverse the region in this flow pattern. The first
feature will move in later today causing an increase in shower activity especially across north central Idaho up into northwest Montana. The precipitation diminishes overnight tonight. The second feature is anticipated Sunday afternoon and evening. A more robust system is expected Monday night into Tuesday.

Friday, February 17, 2017

Five more things to do at the Big Sky Doc Fest

Posted By on Fri, Feb 17, 2017 at 3:32 PM

Being Evel
  • Being Evel
As if we didn't already give you enough to do.

1. It was a blow to fans everywhere when Carrie Fisher died in late December, and even more heartbreaking when her mom, Debbie Reynolds, died the next day. Strangely enough, the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival had planned to show the HBO film Bright Lights—an intimate portrait of the  pair—to open the festival. Bright Lights uses vintage family film and recent interviews to tell the story of the mother-daughter legacy in a way that seems more poignant now than ever.
Tonight, Fri., Feb. 17, at the Wilma, at 7 PM. Free.

2. You barely need to be a conscious human being to know that podcasts are blowing up everywhere. If you're like me, you've got dozens of subscriptions loaded on your phone, including everything from RadioLab and 2 Dope Queens to Missoula-based Last Best Stories, which features slice-of-life tales about Montana people and critters. This year at BSDFF, podcasts get their due as genre of documentary storytelling. Jule Banville, UM School of Journalism professor and producer of Last Best Stories, has set up a listening lounge at Montgomery Distillery to showcase several audio shorts. You can sip an artisan cocktail and plug in to hear stories about, among other things, a bear encounter, a river trip gone wrong, a surprise brunch with David Bowie, and a woman who inherited a small Montana town but doesn't want it.
At Montgomery Distillery Sat., Feb. 18, through Sat., Feb. 25, from 3 PM to 6 PM. Sponsored by UM's School of Journalism and Last Best Stories.

3. In this week's coverage of the festival we wrote about EyeSteelFilm, a Canadian film collective that often deals in experimental works, 17 of which will be showcased as part of a retrospective at this year's festival. Another retrospective will focus on Daniel Junge, an Oscar and Emmy Award-winning filmmaker whose 2015 film, Being Evel, explores the life of Butte-born stunt motorcyclist Evel Knievel. The festival will show 10 of Junge's films including Saving Face, about acid attacks on women in Pakistan, and They Killed Sister Dorothy, about a nun from Ohio killed in the Brazilian rainforest.
Being Evel screens at the Roxy Sat., Feb. 18, at 3 PM.

4. If you're a filmmaker or a film geek, you might be interested in Big Sky Pitch, an open-to-the-public event  where you can watch filmmakers pitch documentary ideas and in-progress films to a panel of producers from ESPN Films, Film Independent, ITVS, Tribeca Film Institute and New York Times Video. Ten projects have been accepted and will each get 20 minutes to dazzle the panel in the hopes of getting funding.
At the UC Theatre Thu., Feb. 23, starting at 9 AM. Free.

5. Viewing films is the most obvious part of the Big Sky Doc Fest, but for aspiring and professional filmmakers it's also an opportunity to network and learn. Doc Shops is a set of workshops on documentary journalism, branding, crowd-funding, technology and distribution. There's even a Filmmaking 101 workshop for those just dipping their toes in. These classes are hosted by companies and organizations from all over, including The Audience Awards, Epic Montana and The Atlantic. The cost is $150, but the workshops are free to UM and MSU students.

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Thursday's avalanche advisory: Moderate danger

Posted By on Thu, Feb 16, 2017 at 7:59 AM

From the West Central Montana Avalanche Center: The current avalanche danger is MODERATE for the west central Montana backcountry. Human triggered avalanches are possible in specific terrain. Conditions will change quickly today as water is added to the snowpack and could easily jump to CONSIDERABLE by early afternoon. Continual evaluation of the avalanche conditions will be essential for recreating in the backcountry today.
moderate-450.png

Good morning, this is Logan King with the West Central Montana Avalanche Center’s avalanche advisory for Thursday, February 16, 2017. This danger rating does not apply to operating ski areas, expires at midnight tonight and is the sole responsibility of the U.S. Forest Service.

For the full advisory including photos and video, visit the West Central Montana Avalanche Center's website.

Here's what the National Weather Service's backcountry forecast has to say as the weekend approaches:

A surge of tropical moisture is making its way through the Northern Rockies today causing widespread precipitation. Snow levels will remain fairly high during the day then drop tonight as a weak cold front moves through the region. The mountains across north central Idaho into west central Montana will receive the heaviest amount of moisture from this event. An active weather pattern will persist over the Northern Rockies through at least mid next week.

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