Monday, August 1, 2016

Mo Club purchased by former Griz standout, NFL player Colt Anderson

Posted By on Mon, Aug 1, 2016 at 3:52 PM

On July 28, former University of Montana Grizzlies MVP Colt Anderson flew to upstate New York for NFL training camp, where he is again looking to earn a roster spot for the upcoming season, this time with the Buffalo Bills. Before his offseason in Montana ended, though, Anderson inked a deal back home.

The Butte native and his brother, Beau, purchased the Missoula Club on July 6. Beau did not disclose the purchase price.

The deal adds a new chapter in the legendary Missoula bar’s history and continues its close tie to Griz football. The Mo Club, as its known, first opened in 1890, and has operated in its current space at 139 W. Main St. since 1926.

Colt Anderson tended bar at the Mo Club while playing for UM, where he helped lead the Griz to an FCS national championship game in 2008. Beau started working there shortly after his younger brother, and he’s stayed with the bar since.

“I always enjoyed working with him here, but I never thought we’d actually own the place together,” Beau says.
Former Griz standout and current NFL player Colt Anderson bought the Mo Club in July with his brother, Beau. - PHOTO BY DEREK BROUWER
  • photo by derek brouwer
  • Former Griz standout and current NFL player Colt Anderson bought the Mo Club in July with his brother, Beau.

Buying the Mo Club is the second business venture Colt has undertaken while also playing in the NFL. In 2010, he and another brother, Luke, launched a clothing company called UPTOP that includes Griz- and Montana-themed apparel.

Beau will manage the bar while Colt continues his football career, though Beau often jokes with bar regulars that he’s putting his brother’s name on the work schedule.

The Andersons’ purchase of the bar from former owner Mark Laslovich was a low-key affair, and Beau says he and his brother don’t plan to change much about the establishment. In fact, the bar looks the same as during their college days but for some modest TV upgrades.
“I want to do everything Las was doing,” Beau says. “He did it the right way.”

Summers have become an anxious time for the family, with no guarantee Colt will make a team each year. The Bills are the fourth team to sign the safety and special teams captain since he went undrafted in 2009.

The Bills are slated to play Anderson’s former team, the Colts, for their first preseason game this season, but don’t expect the Mo Club to host a watch party for its new owner. Beau won’t be hosting it, at least. He prefers to watch his brother’s games from home, rather than the bar, so his attention can be undivided.

Rockies Today, August 1

Posted By on Mon, Aug 1, 2016 at 1:24 PM

Mountain West News is a service of the O’Connor Center for the Rocky Mountain West — a regional studies and public education program at the University of Montana. The Center’s purpose is to serve as an important and credible resource for people in the state and region in understanding the region’s past, present, and future. For more, visit mountainwestnews.org


Porn for the blind (and more News of the Weird)

Posted By on Mon, Aug 1, 2016 at 9:00 AM

Trompe l'Oeil Jungle
A conservation biologist at Australia's University of New South Wales said in July that his team was headed to Botswana to paint eyeballs on cows' rear ends. It's a solution to the problem of farmers who are now forced to kill endangered lions to keep them away from their cows. However, the researchers hypothesize, since lions hunt by stealth and tend to pass up kills if the prey spots them, painting on eyeballs might trick the lions to choose other prey. (For the same reason, woodcutters in India wear masks painted with faces – backward – for protection against tigers.)
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"Big Porn" Gives Back

 In June, the online mega-website Pornhub announced a program to help blind pornography consumers by adding 50 "described videos" to its catalog, with a narrator doing play-by-play of the setting, the actors, clothing (if any) and the action. Said a Pornhub vice president, "It's our way of giving back."  Later in June, another pornography website (with a frisky name – see bit.ly/29O4G9UURL) inaugurated a plan to donate a penny to women's health or abuse prevention organizations every time a user reached a successful "ending" while viewing its videos (maximum two per person per day). Its first day's haul was $39, or $13 for each of three charities (including the Mariska Hargitay-supported Joyful Heart Foundation).

Can't Possibly Be True
A Government Program That Actually Works: A motorist in Regina, Saskatchewan, was issued a $175 traffic ticket on June 8 after he pulled over to ask if he could assist a homeless beggar on the sidewalk. According to the police report cited by CTV News, the "beggar" was actually a cop on stakeout looking for drivers not wearing seat belts (who would thus pay the city $175). Driver Dane Rusk said he had unbuckled his belt to lean over in the seat to give the "beggar" $3 – and moments later, the cop's partner stopped Rusk (thus earning Regina a total of $178!).

One of America's major concerns, according to a U.S. congressman, should be the risk that if an apocalyptic event occurs and we are forced to abandon Earth with only a few species to provide for humanity's survival, NASA might unwisely populate the space "ark" with same-sex couples instead of procreative male-female pairs. This warning was conveyed during the U.S. House session on May 26 by Texas Congressman Louie Gohmert (who seemed not to be aware that gay males might contribute sperm to lesbians for species-continuation).

What Goes Around, Comes Around
 In May, the Times of India reported the death of a man known only as Urjaram, in Rajasthan, India, when, while hosting a party, he forgot that while he was enjoying himself, he had left his camel in the sun all day (during a historic heat wave) with its legs tied together. When Urjaram finally went outside, the enraged camel "lifted him by the neck," "threw him to the ground" and "chewed on his body," severing his head.

The thief who ransacked a community greenhouse in County Durham, England, in July got away, but, according to residents, among his bounty was a bottle of rum that is usually offered only as a constipation remedy, in that it contained a heavy dose of the aggressive laxative "lactulose." Said one resident, "Maybe (the thief has) left a trail" for the police.

Suspicions Confirmed
Many website and app users are suspected of "agreeing" to privacy policies and "terms of service" without comprehending them (or even reading them), though most judges routinely assume the user to have consented to be bound by them. In a controlled-test report released in July, researchers from York University and University of Connecticut found that 74 percent skipped the privacy policy altogether, but, of the "readers," the average time spent was 73 seconds (for wordage that should have taken 30 minutes), and time "reading" terms of service was 51 seconds when it should have taken 16 minutes. (If users had read closely, they might have noticed that they had agreed to share all their personal data with the National Security Agency and that terms of service included giving up their first-born child.)

Latest Rights
Air Force Col. Eugene Caughey is scheduled for court-martial in August in Colorado Springs, Colorado, charged with six counts of adultery (a violation of the Uniform Code of Military Justice)  which he alleges constitutes illegal discrimination because he is heterosexual. That is, only heterosexuals can have the "sexual intercourse" required for adultery since the UCMJ defines the term as between a man and a woman; same-sex pairs cannot have "sexual intercourse." (Even if Caughey prevails on the discrimination issue, he faces other, more serious charges that may bring him life in prison.)

Leading Economic Indicators
Update: News of the Weird reported in 2007 and 2014 that, despite the abundant desert, Middle East developers were buying plenty of beach sand from around the world (because the massive concrete construction in Dubai and Saudi Arabia, among other places, requires coarser sand than the desert grains tempered for centuries by sun and wind). The need has now grown such that London's The Independent reported in June that black market gangs, some violent, are stealing beach sand – and that two dozen entire islands in Indonesia have virtually disappeared since 2005 because of sand-mining.

Farmers high in Nepal's Himalayas are heavily dependent on harvesting a fungus which, when consumed by humans, supposedly produces effects similar to Viagra's – but the region's rising temperatures and diminished rainfall (thought to result from global climate change) threaten the output, according to a June New York Times dispatch. Wealthy Chinese men in Hong Kong and Shanghai may pay the equivalent of $50,000 a pound for the "caterpillar fungus," and about a million Nepalese are involved in the industry, producing about 135 tons a year. (The fungus is from the head of ghost moth larvae living in soil at altitudes of more than 10,000 feet.)

People With Issues
Joshua Long, 26, was arrested in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in June for possession of a suspected-stolen human brain (which he allegedly kept in a shopping bag under the porch at his aunt's trailer home). Police believe that the brain had been a medical teaching aid, but that Long was lacing his marijuana with the brain's embalming fluid. (Long and a former resident of the trailer home called the brain "Freddy.")

The Passing Parade
Large-schnozzed people from all over Europe squared off in June for the World Nose Championship in Langenbruck, Germany (held every five years since 1961). After judges applied precision calipers (adding length plus width), Hans Roest was declared the winner. (Also reported: Contestants believe snuff tobacco and beer to be size-enhancing substances.)  An unnamed man, 55, and woman, 40, were arrested near Joplin, Missouri, in July, after being spotted riding a stolen lawn mower at 8:45 a.m.–naked. They told police that someone had stolen their clothes while they were skinny-dipping and that the mower was their best option to make it home.

A News of the Weird Classic (September 2012)
A centuries-old practice of China's upper class continues today, reported Slate.com in August (2012), except with a bit more circumspection. Rich or powerful people convicted of crimes can still hire replacements to serve their sentences – but because of ubiquitous Internet videos, only if the replacements facially resemble them. Since the convict winds up paying something for his crime (though a relatively small price), Slate called the practice (known as "ding zui") sort of a "cap-and-trade" policy for crime.

Thanks This Week to Caroline Lawler, Rob Zimmer, Larry Kanter, Gary Goldberg, Mark Hiester, Ivan Katz, Chuck Hamilton, Neb Rodgers, Eddie Earles, and Stan Kaplan, and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors. 

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Missing pet pigeon recovered by owner

Posted By on Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 2:20 PM

Lili, the missing pet pigeon, has been found by its owner.

This week's Indy includes a story about a Missoula man's bond with an injured feral pigeon he retrieved from downtown. The pigeon went missing on July 15, and even owner Scott McKay figured the chances of finding her were slim.

But as the story went to press, McKay found Lili after receiving a tip from a guest at the Red Lion Inn. According to McKay, the guest noticed a pigeon acting strange around his hotel room, including sleeping on an air conditioning unit during the night and trying to land on his daughter's shoulder. The Red Lion guest called McKay after walking his dog Wednesday morning and seeing a "lost pigeon" poster.
Scott McKay found his pet pigeon, Lili, after she went missing for nearly two weeks. - PHOTO PROVIDED BY SCOTT MCKAY
  • Photo provided by Scott McKay
  • Scott McKay found his pet pigeon, Lili, after she went missing for nearly two weeks.
McKay put up posters in the area after a YouTube video surfaced of Lili encountering some people outside the Poverello Center.

The bird lost about half her weight during her two weeks on the streets, McKay says, but returned to form once reunited. 

"This sort of experience sort of eliminates my pessimistic view of the world," McKay says.

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Rockies Today, July 28

Posted By on Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 1:07 PM

Mountain West News is a service of the O’Connor Center for the Rocky Mountain West — a regional studies and public education program at the University of Montana. The Center’s purpose is to serve as an important and credible resource for people in the state and region in understanding the region’s past, present, and future. For more, visit mountainwestnews.org


Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Landowner seeks injunction against the Bitterroot National Forest's Westside management project (updated)

Posted By on Wed, Jul 27, 2016 at 5:20 PM

After months of feeling helpless and ignored, a property owner south of Hamilton has decided to take the fight against a controversial logging proposal on the Bitterroot National Forest to the next level.

Yesterday, Fred Rohrbach, along with the Hamilton-based company Bitterroot LLC, filed a legal complaint against the U.S. Forest Service alleging the agency's approval earlier this month of the Westside Collaborative Vegetation Management Project violated several environmental laws. Furthermore, the plaintiffs claim the decision notice and finding of no significant impact signed by forest supervisor Julie King were arbitrary and capricious, and constitute "an abuse of discretion." 
Residents near the Westside Collaborative Vegetation Management Project are now seeking an injunction, hoping to prevent the Bitterroot National Forest from commencing commercial and non-commercial work in areas like the Coyote Coulee trail, pictured here. - COURTESY JEFF LONN
  • Courtesy Jeff Lonn
  • Residents near the Westside Collaborative Vegetation Management Project are now seeking an injunction, hoping to prevent the Bitterroot National Forest from commencing commercial and non-commercial work in areas like the Coyote Coulee trail, pictured here.

Rohrbach's complaint echoes many of the criticisms leveled against the Bitterroot National Forest by property owners adjacent to the project area, who formed the collective Westside Collaborative Residents last fall. In response to the forest's July 6 decision notice, the group issued a statement alleging that a majority of public comment throughout the review process had been "completely ignored." One of the residents, Michele Dieterich, told the Indy several weeks ago that she hoped someone would take the initiative to pursue legal action.

The Bitterroot National Forest had anticipated commencing some non-commercial thinning work associated with the project within the next month or so, with commercial timber harvests to follow as early as this fall. The request for injunctive relief would not only prevent those efforts but also prohibit the forest from advertising bids or entering into any contracts. The plaintiffs also hope to keep the Bitterroot from proceeding with the construction of new permanent roads and a bridge over Camas Creek. 

"Despite the Forest Service’s assessment and conclusion to the contrary, portions of the Westside Project will have significant adverse environmental impacts," the complaint states, "and will affect public health and historical and cultural sites in the project boundary."

Bitterroot National Forest Supervisor Julie King had not yet seen the complaint when she spoke with the Indy Thursday morning. However, she acknowledged her office did anticipate some sort of legal action.

"We worked really hard to settle all the objections and concerns," she said. "All in all, this is a good project and much needed. I guess I'm hopeful at this point in time, but I don't know what's all being complained about."

King added it “remains to be seen” how the complaint will impact the timeline for the project.

Rockies Today, July 27

Posted By on Wed, Jul 27, 2016 at 3:04 PM

Mountain West News is a service of the O’Connor Center for the Rocky Mountain West — a regional studies and public education program at the University of Montana. The Center’s purpose is to serve as an important and credible resource for people in the state and region in understanding the region’s past, present, and future. For more, visit mountainwestnews.org


Happiest Hour: Rough Stock Saloon

Posted By on Wed, Jul 27, 2016 at 10:38 AM

Where you are: The Rough Stock Saloon. It’s gone by the name for six years, and before that it was called Swede’s for “forever,” according to one regular. The Rough Stock is just off Drummond’s Front Street, parallel to the train tracks and down from the Conoco gas station. There’s an open outdoor patio with a view across the tracks that on a clear day stretches off toward the Pintlers.

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Why you’re here: Perhaps you’re stopping here on your way to or from Philipsburg , or because you just fished a stretch of the upper Clark Fork. Or maybe, like the group of elderly ladies in bathing suits who catcalled an Indy reporter last Friday evening, you’ve just been tubing and drinking the afternoon away, far from the crowds in Missoula. For whatever the reason, The Rough Stock offers a cool and dark interior that’s perfect for hiding from a hot summer day. 

What you’re drinking: A domestic can or bottle, probably. They’re cheap ($3 for a Bud Light), although the microbrew selection is also pretty good, featuring beers from Great Northern in Whitefish and The Front Brewing Company in Great Falls. 

The scene: “Rough stock,” for the uninitiated, refers to the bulls and horses raised to buck off cowboys in rodeos. Just across the river from Drummond’s rodeo grounds, the Rough Stock holds true to its name with a corner full of photographs signed by rodeo riders. Most signatures thank the bar for “a good time,” though one stands out as thanking the bar “for the kind glass of water."

Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Your future, a little early

Posted By on Wed, Jul 27, 2016 at 9:00 AM

Find Rob Brezsny's "Free Will Astrology" online, every Wednesday, one day before it hits the Indy's printed pages. 
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ARIES (March 21-April 19): Free your body. Don't ruminate and agonize about it. FREE YOUR BODY! Be brave and forceful. Do it simply and easily. Free your gorgeously imperfect, wildly intelligent body. Allow it to be itself in all of its glory. Tell it you're ready to learn more of its secrets and adore its mysteries. Be in awe of its unfathomable power to endlessly carry out the millions of chemical reactions that keep you alive and thriving. How can you not be overwhelmed with gratitude for your hungry, curious, unpredictable body? Be grateful for its magic. Love the blessings it bestows on you. Celebrate its fierce animal elegance.   

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The people of many cultures have imagined the sun god as possessing masculine qualities. But in some traditions, the Mighty Father is incomplete without the revitalizing energies of the Divine Mother. The Maoris, for example, believe that every night the solar deity has to marinate in her nourishing uterine bath. Otherwise he wouldn't be strong enough to rise in the morning. And how does this apply to you? Well, you currently have resemblances to the weary old sun as it dips below the horizon. I suspect it's time to recharge your powers through an extended immersion in the deep, dark waters of the primal feminine.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): An Interesting Opportunity is definitely in your vicinity. It may slink tantalizingly close to you in the coming days, even whisper your name from afar. But I doubt that it will knock on your door. It probably won't call you seven times on the phone or flash you a big smile or send you an engraved invitation. So you should make yourself alert for the Interesting Opportunity's unobtrusive behavior. It could be a bit shy or secretive or modest. Once you notice it, you may have to come on strong — you know, talk to it sweetly or ply it with treats.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):It's time to get more earthy and practical about practicing your high ideals and spiritual values. Translate your loftiest intentions into your most intimate behavior. Ask yourself, "How does Goddess want me to respond when my co-worker pisses me off?", or "How would Goddess like me to brush my teeth and watch TV and make love?" For extra credit, get a t-shirt that says, "Goddess was my co-pilot, but we crash-landed in the wilderness and I was forced to eat her."

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Be alert for white feathers gliding on the wind. Before eating potato chips, examine each one to see if it bears a likeness of Rihanna or the Virgin Mary. Keep an eye out, too, for portents like robots wearing dreadlocked wigs or antique gold buttons lying in the gutter or senior citizens cursing at invisible Martians. The appearance of anomalies like these will be omens that suggest you will soon be the recipient of crazy good fortune. But if you would rather not wait around for chance events to trigger your good luck, simply make it your fierce intention to generate it. Use your optimism-fueled willpower and your flair for creative improvisation. You will have abundant access to these talents in the coming weeks.


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Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Rockies Today, July 26

Posted By on Tue, Jul 26, 2016 at 11:26 AM

Mountain West News is a service of the O’Connor Center for the Rocky Mountain West — a regional studies and public education program at the University of Montana. The Center’s purpose is to serve as an important and credible resource for people in the state and region in understanding the region’s past, present, and future. For more, visit mountainwestnews.org

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