Thursday, July 10, 2014

We've all seen the plane photos, but the Clark Fork's history is even stranger — and far more disturbing

Posted By on Thu, Jul 10, 2014 at 10:32 AM

Missoula whitewater rafter Daniel Berger (at rear) and friends float past three airliner fuselages dumped in Montanas Clark Fork river by a train derailment last week. (Courtesy Chuck Irestone)
  • Missoula whitewater rafter Daniel Berger (at rear) and friends float past three airliner fuselages dumped in Montana's Clark Fork river by a train derailment last week. (Courtesy Chuck Irestone)

Brad Tyer knows a thing or two about the Clark Fork. The former Indy editor and author of Opportunity, Montana: Big Copper, Bad Water, and the Burial of an American Landscape, just wrote about the river's latest brush with infamy.

Titled "Troubled Waters: One Train Derailment, Three Boeing Fuselages, and a River’s History of Ecological Abuse," Tyer's piece covers a lot of important ground (er, water?) and puts the Boeing incident in context.

"The history of the Clark Fork is a history of things being dumped—by accident and by design—in a river where they don’t belong," he writes.

Check it out and, if you haven't already, check out his book.

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