Friday, November 19, 2010

Dented heads, turducken, Four Loco and other alt weekly links

Posted By on Fri, Nov 19, 2010 at 2:15 PM

muuugshot2b.jpg

Miami New Times launched a new blog feature called Mugshots Friday. Its debut is startling, as you can see above.

Seven Days explains turducken, complete with an easy recipe. 'Bout time someone did.

Four Loco, the controversial caffeinated malt beverage, never made it to Montana shelves. (Crazy, right? We checked with both Zip and Summit, though, and they confirmed it never hit our market.) But that doesn't mean the FDA's ban of these specialty drinks didn't scare the pants off of craftbrewers who use coffee and ginseng in their beers. Luckily, the Charleston City Paper reveals the FDA isn't targeting that kind of drink.

Willamette Week wonders why hundreds of millions of casino dollars haven't lifted Oregon tribes out of poverty.

The Boston Phoenix offers its take on how Democrats will cope with a sudden loss of power in D.C. (Hint: "Yeah, it's gonna suck for them for two years," says veteran political consultant Scott Ferson of Liberty Group in Boston.)

The Stranger's Brendan Kiley recently completed a three-part series titled, "The Mystery of the Tainted Cocaine." He explores what a drug used to deworm livestock—a drug that can obliterate your immune system—is doing in your cocaine, and, in part three, how to test your stash.

Finally, if you didn't catch it on the national news or on programs like "The Rachel Maddow Show," The Texas Observer, working with the Innocence Project, recently broke the news that new DNA evidence undermines the 2000 execution of Claude Jones.

His murder conviction was based on a single piece of forensic evidence recovered from the crime scene—a strand of hair—that prosecutors claimed belonged to Jones.

But DNA tests completed this week at the request of the Observer and the New York-based Innocence Project show the hair didn’t belong to Jones after all. The day before his death in December 2000, Jones asked for a stay of execution so the strand of hair could be submitted for DNA testing. He was denied by then-Gov. George W. Bush.

  • Email
  • Print

Comments (2)

Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

© 2014 Missoula News/Independent Publishing | Powered by Foundation